Why Appraisals? First in a Series

I tend to be a contemplative person by nature. Often, I like to think about the "why?" of things. Why did that happen? Why is that person that way? Why, especially, am I the way that I am? Given that appraising is a fairly major career shift for me (after 15 years as a government auditor, plus a couple of other things along the way...), I think it is appropriate to wonder what, exactly, is it that draws me to the profession of appraising?


To begin, like most other professions, appraising is primarily service-oriented. Appraisers do not typically conduct an appraisal for themselves. They are done in the service of others. Often, these are families or individuals who might be going through a stressful time. Perhaps a loved one has died or is dying. Perhaps there is a divorce. Perhaps they have suffered a loss as a result of fire, theft, flood, or other disaster. As with other professionals called in to help provide guidance and support during a difficult situation, an appraiser provides, through his or her expertise and experience, reassurance and calm. Relieving stress is inherently part of the job and one of the benefits to the client. This can be very gratifying, to know that you have provided comfort and simplified the otherwise potentially overwhelming circumstances of another.


Just as you might call a lawyer or an accountant, there may be times that an appraiser can be an important part of relieving you of stress and helping you manage difficult circumstances. Having the opportunity to be that person is one of the reasons that I have chosen to be an appraiser.